What is Homoeopathy

Homeopathy

Homeopathy  (also spelled homoeopathy or homœopathy; from the Greek hómoios=like, páthos=suffering) is a system of alternative medicine created in 1796 by Samuel Hahnemann, based on his doctrine of like cures like, according to which a substance that causes the symptoms of a disease in healthy people will cure similar symptoms in sick people. Hahnemann believed that the underlying causes of disease were phenomena that he termed miasms, and that homeopathic remedies addressed these. The remedies are prepared by repeatedly diluting a chosen substance in alcohol or distilled water, followed by forceful striking on an elastic body.Homeopaths select remedies by consulting reference books known as repertories, and by considering the totality of the patient's symptoms, personal traits, physical and psychological state, and life history.

Homeopathy is based on the following premises and concepts:

1. Maintenance of normal health depends on efficient physiological functions as controlled by a complex regulating mechanism designated by the term homeostasis.

2. When threatened by disorder or disease, all living organisms exert an effort to maintain or regain normal physiological equilibrium.

3. Recovery from disease is dependent on the inherent vital force of the organism, i.e., its ability to re-establish homeostasis.

4. In general, most human disorders possess two components, the psyche and the soma, which produce emotional, mental, and/or physical symptoms. *

5. The human organism, by virtue of such inherent properties as sensitivity, irritability, and reactivity, may be provoked into some physiological responses by various types of physical, chemical, or biological incitants. When caused by a drug, this is regarded as an iatrogenic response or reaction.

6. A substance which is capable of evoking certain symptoms when administered to an apparently healthy human being under controlled conditions may become a potentially effective therapeutic agent when prepared according to the standards of the Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia, and administered in accordance with the principles of the Homeomethodology.

Homeopathy is a safe, gentle, and natural system of healing that works with your body to relieve symptoms, restore itself, and improve your overall health. It is extremely safe to use, even with very small children and pets, has none of the side effects of many traditional medications, is very affordable, is made from natural substances,

History:

Homeopaths have asserted that Hippocrates, in about 400 BC, when he prescribed a small dose of mandrake root – which in larger doses produced mania – to treat mania itself; in the 16th century the pioneer of pharmacology Paracelsus declared that small doses of "what makes a man ill also cures him. Samuel Hahnemann (1755–1843) gave homeopathy its name and expanded its principles in the late 18th century. At that time, mainstream medicine used methods like bloodletting and purging, and administered complex mixtures, such as Venice treacle, which was made from 64 substances including opium, myrrh, and viper's flesh.These treatments often worsened symptoms and sometimes proved fatal. Hahnemann rejected these practices – which had been extolled for centuries – as irrational and inadvisable; instead, he advocated the use of single drugs at lower doses and promoted an immaterial, vitalistic view of how living organisms function, believing that diseases have spiritual, as well as physical causes.

Hahnemann's concept:

The term "homeopathy" used by Hahnemann and first  print in 1807. Hahnemann conceived of homeopathy while translating a medical treatise by the Scottish physician and chemist William Cullen into German. Being skeptical of Cullen's theory concerning Cinchona's use for curing malaria, Hahnemann ingested some of the bark specifically to investigate what would happen. He experienced fever, shivering and joint pain: symptoms similar to those of malaria itself. From this, Hahnemann came to believe that all effective drugs produce symptoms in healthy individuals similar to those of the diseases that they treat, in accord with the "law of similars" that had been proposed by ancient physicians.

Homeopathic "provings":

Hahnemann began to test what effects substances produced in humans, a procedure that would later become known as "homeopathic proving". These tests required subjects to test the effects of ingesting substances by clearly recording all of their symptoms as well as the ancillary conditions under which they appeared. A collection of provings was published in 1805, and a second collection of 65 remedies appeared in his book, Materia Medica Pura, in 1810.

Since Hahnemann believed that large doses of drugs that caused similar symptoms would only aggravate illness, he advocated extreme dilutions of the substances; he devised a technique for making dilutions that he believed would preserve a substance's therapeutic properties while removing its harmful effects. Hahnemann believed that this process aroused and enhanced "the spirit-like medicinal powers of the crude substances". He gathered and published a complete overview of his new medical system in his 1810 book, The Organon of the Healing Art, whose 6th edition, published in 1921, is still used by homeopaths today.